Technically, what are shooting stars?

Technically, what are shooting stars?

Dying stars

Supernovas

Rocks or dust hitting Earth’s atmosphere

Satellites

When you make a wish on a “shooting star,” what you’re wishing upon is not a star at all. The streaks of light sometimes spotted in the night sky are actually small rocks or bits of dust entering and burning up in the Earth’s atmosphere. You may know them as meteoroids. The streak of light that trails behind them is called a meteor – a.k.a., a shooting star.

If a piece of the meteoroid manages to make it to Earth’s surface without burning up, whatever hits is called a meteorite. Meteor showers occur when the Earth travels through comet debris along its orbit of the Sun. Each shower is named for the constellation in which these “shooting stars” appear to emit from (“appear” being the keyword here, as constellations ARE actually stars). So, if you ever do catch a falling star and put it in your pocket, you’ll actually be catching a meteor.

Answer: The correct answer is Rocks or dust hitting Earth’s atmosphere

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