[Answered] During World War II, the military developed pesticides to protect soldiers at war from disease-carrying insects. After the war,

During World War II, the military developed pesticides to protect soldiers at war from disease-carrying insects. After the war, Americans began to use pesticides at home too. But pesticides had unforeseen dangers. Scientist Rachel Carson, who worked for the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service, observed that birds were getting sick and dying after eating insects exposed to the pesticide DDT. Carson’s book Silent Spring warned that pesticides meant for insects were affecting the whole ecosystem, with the potential to make human beings sick as well. Carson’s research, which resulted in a ban on DDT, is credited with inspiring the modern environmental movement. She reminded people that we are part of nature as much as any other plant or animal.

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