[Answered] At the end of Chapter 9, Krakauer describes Irish monks known as the papar who sought out lonely places so much

At the end of Chapter 9, Krakauer describes Irish monks known as the papar who sought out lonely places so much that they left Iceland for Greenland when some Norwegians showed up because they thought that it had become too crowded, even though the land was nearly uninhabited. Krakauer writes, “Reading of these monks, one cannot thinking of Everett Reuss and Chris McCandless” (97). Krakauer implies that there is some kind of similarity between Reuss, McCandless, and the papar, but instead of making a specific connection, he just says “one cannot thinking of.” Is this a good argument? Why or why not? Also, what do you think is the similarity Krakauer is talking about? write 10-11 lines.

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